Creativity and Farmers: finding happiness the easy way

Creativity is not a character trait is a behavior.

It is too easy to pass this off as a comedian or celebrity whose words are to be marginalized.    If your like me when I hear actors using their celebrity to hop ona cause or to speak about politics my attention span is as short as a the life expectancy of an earthworm in the chicken run.  Just because we were entertained by you does not mean that we want your opinion an how to operate morally.   But every once in a while someone transcends their art and becomes more than an actor or singer or painter and we get to see the process that makes them human.  After all we are all certainly students of humanity in all it's forms, even if some are more inclined to assimilate their observations.  Bono is not just a singer but his ONE campaign has change how we see his influence.  Sean Penn has made Haiti and the continuous conditions there,  part of the conversation long after the Hurricane and has earned a voice to be heard when it comes to humanitarian cases.  Recently Russell Brand recently called for revolution.....his voice can still promptly be ignored as he has not turned the angst that average people feel into productivity or even into an optimistic conversation.  

John Cleese this week was the anchor to a lesson I have not been wanting to acknowledge for some time.  By this I mean, that the thought he put forth in this video, was not completely unique to me but tied up a message that has come from many angles.  My lesson has been this; life is the culmination of purposeful musing and boldness of choices.  The people who you and I desire to be around are not those that have it all together but those that have a story to tell.  A story of how taking risk made their life all the better no matter the outcome.  Stories of people willing to think openly and try another route even if it turned out to be a dead end.  These are the passionate one, the happy ones, the inspirational ones.  As we transition to a farmstead of our own we have found ourselves living in a neighborhood that is much more affluent that we have ever been before.  It has been healthy for me to get to know these neighbors better and see behind the wall of affluent people.  Let me let you in on a secret through my observation.  People who have luxury have the same interpersonal relationship problems that we all do, and often their money is fuel for those fires.  They may eat out more or have more sq feet to their home but they also suffer from depression.  Their car is newer but their commute is the same frustrating time as yours.  There is no utopia to being monetarily advantaged and none of them are certainly any happier for having more cash.  They are in the same lot as us all; those on a journey to live in their ideal selves are happy and ever pursuing the good in their lives.  Those who are closed continue to self medicate their dreariness with what ever the TV tells them they need or are deficient in true american cyclical fashion. 

John Cleese give the non practicing optimist a chance to rediscover the process of inquisitiveness and play.  Last week I wrote about Wendell Berry and summed him up with the though of find the right thing and do it.   Put them both together and you have the makings of a good man.   A playful, risk taking, moral steward of resources and environment that is not afraid to fail for the good of those in his community.   That last sentence is my aspiration